The record-breaking meteor that was used as a door stopper

Written by Jason Collins | updated

One of the largest meteorites ever recorded in Michigan went unnoticed by experts for more than 80 years because it languished inconspicuously as a hedgerow on a local farm. Geologists further determined the meteorite’s significance and value after its “rediscovery,” which led to its identification as an iron-nickel space rock.

A meteorite that crashed into Earth nearly a century ago was used as a door stopper on a Michigan farm.

according to ScienceAlertThis humble 10-kilogram (22-pound) rock spent decades working as a kebab on a local farm in Michigan before it was officially recognized by the scientific community. Specifically, ranch owner David Mazurek asked Mona Serpico, a geoscientist at Central Michigan University (CMU), if she could examine a rock that served as a barn door stopper on his ranch if at all possible. meteor. To Serpicho’s surprise, the rock in question is actually a meteorite and very valuable.

As a geologist, Sirbescu receives regular requests from local residents to examine all kinds of potential meteorites. People bring in all kinds of exotic rocks for appraisal, as meteorites tend to be very expensive on the collector’s market, but most of these rocks are just rocks. However, Mazurek’s case was different, as he brought in an actual meteorite, and for Sirbescu it was the first positive test in the past 18 years of her career.

Eventually, Mazurk realized that people make money finding and selling small pieces of meteorites, so he took the rock in for evaluation. You can imagine his surprise when he learned that his 22-pounder would earn him about $75,000.

The meteorite, now called the Edmure meteorite, is actually a chunky iron-nickel space rock, containing about 12% nickel by weight, which is actually quite a lot. But the story behind the space rock is much more interesting.

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asteroid
If you need a door stop, be sure to watch the night sky for falling rocks.

meteorite history

According to Mazurek, the meteorite’s story began even before he purchased the farm in 1988. While exploring the property with the previous owner, the latter revealed that the rock had fallen from the sky in 1930 before serving as a door stop.

The landlord recounted how he and his father witnessed the meteor hitting their property, causing a great deal of noise. However, in the morning, they found a warm rock inside the resulting crater. The meteor continued to act as a doorstop for the next 30 years and only occasionally left the property when the Mazurek children took the rook to school for show and talk.

Eventually, Mazurk realized that people make money finding and selling small pieces of meteorites, so he took the rock in for evaluation. You can imagine his surprise when he learned that his 22-pounder would earn him about $75,000. He sold the meteorite to the MSU Abrams Planetarium and pledged 10% of the proceeds to Central Michigan University’s Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, where the inconspicuous doorstop was identified as a very valuable meteorite.


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