Apple iPhone 15 Pro price hike is said to be under consideration

  • Apple is considering raising the price of its high-end iPhone Pros when new models are introduced this fall, according to a Bloomberg News report.
  • Since 2019, Apple has sold a high-end iPhone Pro that starts in the US at $999 and a Max model with a larger screen for at least $1,099.

Men talk on their mobile phones in front of an iPhone 14 ad, in Kolkata on September 27, 2022.

Norphoto | Norphoto | Getty Images

Apple is considering raising the price of its high-end iPhone Pros when it introduces new models this fall. According to Bloomberg.

Apple usually releases new iPhones in September. Since 2019, Apple has sold a high-end iPhone Pro that starts in the US at $999 and a Max model with a larger screen for at least $1,099.

Now, Apple’s latest high-end models could receive a price increase that should boost Apple’s overall revenue by increasing the average selling price of a new iPhone.

Apple did not raise prices of new iPhone models in the United States during the pandemic, though the company has dealt with parts shortages and said inflation is driving up costs for some services like shipping and parts.

However, Apple often changes the prices of its products around the world in response to currency fluctuations, including on last year’s iPhone 14 devices.

Apple did not respond to a request for comment.

New iPhone models could have a USB-C charger, rather than a proprietary Lightning charger, after new European regulations were passed last year. The new Pro models could come with a titanium case and thinner bezels, accordingly for Supply Chain Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.

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The price increase could also help Apple take advantage of recent trends in the smartphone industry. Analysts say overall smartphone shipments have been down for a year, but consumers still have an appetite for the best and most affordable devices.

“While the recovery in global smartphone demand is less than expected, the premium market (and thus Apple) appears less affected,” Deutsche Bank analyst Sydney Ho wrote in a note on Monday.

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