SEOPS Plus subscribers get out of the big potential promotion tax

The PS5 DualSense is floating in the universe waiting for PS Plus subscription day.

picture: Sony

New and improved Sony playstation plus program It has already been launched in some parts of the world, and players seem to be doing it Running in All kinds of issues. But what gamers are feeling most right now is a potential wrinkle in how upgrade pricing works which could leave some with hundreds of dollars in limbo.

The PS Plus big fix, who currently lives in Asia, effectively combines it with PlayStation Now and separates the extras across three levels. Essentials is the same as the current subscription, Extra includes an on-demand Game Pass-like game library and gives Premium subscribers access to cloud streaming and classic games. The new levels are $100 and $120 per year, and will require existing PS Plus subscribers to upgrade to access them. makes sense.

but what Some players find Is that if they previously purchased a discounted version of PS Plus, they now need to pay the teams to fully upgrade to the new, more expensive levels. Here’s how one job This has gotten quite a bit of attention on the PlayStation Plus subreddit that explains it. “For example, if you buy 1 year plus at a 25% discount, which is $45,” it writes. “To upgrade to an additional plan, you must pay 100-45 = $55, not 100-60 = $40”

Another issue is that players can apparently not only upgrade for a month or a year, they have to upgrade for the duration of their current membership. So if you decide, I don’t know, to buy an extra 10 years of PS Plus when it was heavily discounted, you will now have to pay to upgrade the entire contract at the full price.

This may sound strange, but it’s not uncommon for some of PlayStation’s biggest fans to hoard years and years of subscriptions when there’s a huge discount on them. This is what happened earlier this year when PS was now selling half the time And a number of gamers rushed to take advantage of the deal, especially since subscriptions will automatically carry over to PS Plus Premium subscriptions once the software is combined.

Nathan Drake hangs on a ledge trying to remember how many PS Plus submarines he's assembled.

Nathan Drake tries to remember how many PS Plus submarines he’s assembled.
screenshot: Sony

“How many years have you all stacked up?” asked the industry expert Wario64 who first announced the sale. Back in April. It looks like Nico Partners analyst Danielle Ahmed is full Until 2031. So I did others. Sony finally banned subscription stacking After a few weeks. It now appears that the PS5 maker is planning to redeem what gamers may have thrown off the small savings. In the case of a 10-year stack, subscribers may end up paying another $600 to upgrade in full.

Potential scenarios like this are already eliciting a small backlash in the comments on Reddit, social media, and the PlayStation blog. “PlayStation is the most profitable ever and makes billions and billions of dollars,” chirp YouTube MBG. “Expecting a little goodwill and a little greed from time to time is okay.”

At the same time, it’s possible that current anecdotes from players in places like Hong Kong are just pricing errors that will soon be corrected. The upgrade process may also differ from region to region. Sony did not immediately respond to a request for comment for clarification.

One thing is for sure, much of the PS Plus overhaul rollout has been unnecessarily confusing. Back in April Sony released Stunning scheme Show PS Plus and Now Coupon conversion rates for subscribers switching from the current service to the upgraded service. And earlier this month, a post on the PlayStation Blog outlined a sample of the games coming to the new version of the service Full of caveats and asterisks.

Hopefully, one of those big asterisks isn’t hidden fees for stacked memberships. The revamped PS Plus program goes live in the US on June 13th.

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