An old, rusty, modified Toyota Supra with 388,000 miles on it is about to sell for more than a new car

For some generation A80 Toyota Supra Turbo – non-targa engine, on the left side, Manual version, natch-He is The holy grail of performance cars of the Radwood era. The iconic 2JZ turbocharged six-cylinder engine is known for its ability to produce irresponsible power, and this engineering strength translates into longevity. Perhaps this 388,000-mile example proves that beyond a doubt Currently up for bid on Bring a TrailerAnd She's going to go for some serious doughtaking into account its condition and the distance traveled.

Car collectors often value originality, low mileage, and preservation as paramount. This car has none of that, as the odometer has a reading high enough to be considered a high-mileage example four times over, and a modifications list that looks like it's circa 2006 Super Street Magazine Cover story, and some important concerns about rust. Personally, I value an enthusiast driver's car much more than a low-mileage trailer car, but this car is approaching the point where it should be considered more valuable for its parts than as a whole.

An image of the article titled An old, rusty, modified Toyota Supra with 388,000 miles on the verge of being sold for more than a new car.

Bidding, as of this writing, is approaching $50,000, and has already surpassed the $46,440 base MSRP for the all-new 2024 GR Supra. If you look at the MKIV Supra market, fifty grand is absolutely unheard of for one of these cars. A low-mileage 1994 Supra Turbo sold for $232,000 At the height of the car collecting craze in September of 2022, but more recently A decent condition example with 45,000 miles sold for $75,000, and it would take at least $25,000 to make this blue color as nice as this. Rust, bad paint, and a completely ripped-up interior all need a bunch of work, and none of that is cheap.

An image of the article titled An old, rusty, modified Toyota Supra with 388,000 miles on the verge of being sold for more than a new car.

I'll admit that I've never spent close to $50,000 on a car, but if I did and had this level of “clean Florida title” applause, I'd be sorely disappointed. Not just with the car, but myself.

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