Hardware Guides

  Home arrow Hardware Guides arrow Setting up Your Hardware Firewall
Watch our Tech Videos 
Dev Hardware Forums 
Computer Cases  
Computer Processors  
Computer Systems  
Digital Cameras  
Flat Panels  
Gaming  
Hardware Guides  
Hardware News  
Input Devices  
Memory  
Mobile Devices  
Motherboards  
Networking Hardware  
Opinions  
PC Cooling  
PC Speakers  
Peripherals  
Power Supply Units  
Software  
Sound Cards  
Storage Devices  
Tech Interviews  
User Experiences  
Video Cards  
Weekly Newsletter
 
Developer Updates  
Free Website Content 
 RSS  Articles
 RSS  Forums
 RSS  All Feeds
Write For Us 
Contact Us 
Site Map 
Privacy Policy 
Support 
 USERNAME
 
 PASSWORD
 
 
  >>> SIGN UP!  
  Lost Password? 
HARDWARE GUIDES

Setting up Your Hardware Firewall
By: Dan Wellman
  • Search For More Articles!
  • Disclaimer
  • Author Terms
  • Rating: 4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars4 stars / 21
    2006-04-04

    Table of Contents:
  • Setting up Your Hardware Firewall
  • Security Settings
  • Blocking Sites
  • Protecting Ports
  • Custom Services

  • Rate this Article: Poor Best 
      ADD THIS ARTICLE TO:
      Del.ici.ous Digg
      Blink Simpy
      Google Spurl
      Y! MyWeb Furl
    Email Me Similar Content When Posted
    Add Developer Shed Article Feed To Your Site
    Email Article To Friend
    Print Version Of Article
    PDF Version Of Article
     
     

    SEARCH DEV HARDWARE

    Setting up Your Hardware Firewall


    (Page 1 of 5 )

    So, you’ve spent your hard-earned cash on a hardware firewall to protect your home network against intruders, or perhaps you have upgraded to a wireless router that includes a built-in firewall. Whatever the case may be, although most models of hardware firewalls are very easily and quickly set up with a wizard-style interface and a few clicks, the default security settings of the router largely remain off.

    To improve on this situation, you will need to manually configure your router to provide more security.  If you have a network, you are a network administrator; whether you have one desktop and a laptop, or a desktop in every room and a couple of network-enabled consoles, you alone are responsible for the integrity and security of your home network.

    This article is based on a Netgear DG834GT router with built-in firewall that I recently reviewed.  If you do not own this model, don’t worry as most current hardware firewalls/routers are administered in the same way. They use a browser-based interface that you access in the same way as a web page.  The features may differ from model to model but the principal is the same, and many similar features are found across brands.

    The automatic configuration of modern routers normally set the router itself to the network device with an IP address of 192.168.0.1 and other devices (desktop PC, laptop, etc) as 192.168.0.2, 192.168.0.3 etc, etc. 

    To access the administration utility, you normally only need to open a browser and type http://192.168.0.2 in the address bar.  If this does nothing or displays a “Page cannot be found” message, it may not be configured/installed correctly or you may need to access it in some other way, so check the documentation or manufacturers web site for advice.

    You will probably need to enter a password to access the admin pages, if you have not already changed this, the default password will be in the documentation for the device. 

     

    More Hardware Guides Articles
    More By Dan Wellman

    blog comments powered by Disqus

    HARDWARE GUIDES ARTICLES

    - Top 10 Valentine`s Tech Gifts for Men
    - Top 10 Women`s Tech Gifts for Valentine`s Day
    - Intro to RAIDS
    - 2012`s Most Anticipated Tech Releases
    - Top Tech Stocking Stuffers for 2011
    - The Top Tech Gifts Under $100 for 2011
    - How to Improve Your Smartphone`s Battery Life
    - Top Holiday Tech Gifts for 2011
    - Quick Tips for PC Beginners
    - How To Overclock Your CPU
    - TrueCrypt Hidden OS: Completing the Decoy
    - TrueCrypt: Hiding Your Operating System
    - Creating a Hidden OS with TrueCrypt
    - Cloning Your Hard Drive: Implementing SysPre...
    - Cloning Hard Drives: Part Three

    Developer Shed Affiliates

     




    © 2003-2019 by Developer Shed. All rights reserved. DS Cluster - Follow our Sitemap
    KEITHLEE2zdeconfigurator/configs/INFUSIONSOFT_OVERLAY.phpzdeconfigurator/configs/ OFFLOADING INFUSIONSOFTLOADING INFUSIONSOFT 1debug:overlay status: OFF
    overlay not displayed overlay cookie defined: TI_CAMPAIGN_1012_D OVERLAY COOKIE set:
    status off